Four U.S. companies are developing plans for biomass-fueled power plants, relying primarily, if not completely, on wood waste

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Four U.S. companies are developing plans for biomass-fueled power plants, relying primarily, if not completely, on wood waste
Peregrine Energy Corp., Greenville, S.C., will invest $135 million in the development of a new woody biomass-fueled cogeneration plant at Sonoco’s Hartsville, S.C., Manufacturing Complex. According to Peregrine, the 50-megawatt facility will generate enough electricity to power about 14,000 homes and will replace Sonoco’s existing coal-fired boilers, using pre-commercial thinning and waste logging residues. The proposed facility will sit on a 12- to 15-acre site within the Sonoco complex and will use emission control technologies that meet Best Achievable Control Technology standards, according to Peregrine. Construction is slated to begin once the air permit, to be filed in May, is issued and the company hopes the plant will be commercially operational by the fall of 2012.
Once the facility is operating, Peregrine says it will sell the entire electrical output and all renewable energy certificates associated with the plant to Progress Energy Carolinas Inc., and low pressure steam from the plant to Sonoco for use in manufacturing recycled paperboard and other converted products in Hartsville. Peregrine also supplies air pollution control systems to its clients, including equipment, foundations, piping, wiring, controls and ductwork.
Energy Investors Funds LLC, a private equity fund manager that invests in the U.S. energy and power sector, recently acquired a 30-MW biomass power project currently under construction in Watertown, Conn., that is expected to create more than 120 jobs, according to the company. Watertown Renewable Power LLC will run on small tree branches, stumps, old cargo pallets and trees taken down as part of forestry management programs, generating enough clean electricity to power about 30,000 homes. Hundreds of construction jobs also will be created during the 24-month building period, the company boasts. Tamarack Energy Inc. started the WRP project planning more than two years ago and recently sold it to EIF for an undisclosed amount. EIF has invested in other clean energy projects, including 16 hydroelectric facilities and 19 landfill gas-fired facilities across the U.S. that turn waste methane into electricity and pipeline-quality renewable natural gas.
In Indiana, BioEnergy Development Co. will further its clean energy endeavors through a biomass electric generation plant to be constructed on a coal strip mine site in Clay County, according to BioEnergy. BioEnergy Power LLC will generate about 27 MW of electricity from wood waste previously provided to a paper plant in Terre Haute, which closed in 2007, and is expected to create 25 to 30 full-time jobs. Rob Swain, BioEnergy Development Co. president, says he chose the location because of its fuel supply and logistics. BioEnergy signed a letter of intent with an area utility company and has secured the land for development. The company also is in negotiations with a wood waste aggregator to supply the plant with feedstock, mostly from within a 100-mile radius of the proposed site, it said. BioEnergy Power hopes to begin construction by fall of 2009 and finish by the end of 2010, employing 25 to 30 full-time workers. BioEnergy also is in discussions with other companies to capture carbon dioxide for use in developing other types of energy in an attempt to further lower the plant’s carbon footprint.
Florida Biomass Energy LLC, Bradenton, Fla., proposed to build a 60-MW plant on a 53-acre site northwest of Bradenton near Palmetto, Fla. The $185 million-project primarily will use wood chips, but could burn animal material and nonfood crops in a circulating fluidized bed boiler to heat water, thus generating steam that would power a turbine and generate electricity

Peregrine Energy Corp., Greenville, S.C., will invest $135 million in the development of a new woody biomass-fueled cogeneration plant at Sonoco’s Hartsville, S.C., Manufacturing Complex. According to Peregrine, the 50-megawatt facility will generate enough electricity to power about 14,000 homes and will replace Sonoco’s existing coal-fired boilers, using pre-commercial thinning and waste logging residues. The proposed facility will sit on a 12- to 15-acre site within the Sonoco complex and will use emission control technologies that meet Best Achievable Control Technology standards, according to Peregrine. Construction is slated to begin once the air permit, to be filed in May, is issued and the company hopes the plant will be commercially operational by the fall of 2012.

FUENTE – World of Bioenergy – 29/04/09

Once the facility is operating, Peregrine says it will sell the entire electrical output and all renewable energy certificates associated with the plant to Progress Energy Carolinas Inc., and low pressure steam from the plant to Sonoco for use in manufacturing recycled paperboard and other converted products in Hartsville. Peregrine also supplies air pollution control systems to its clients, including equipment, foundations, piping, wiring, controls and ductwork.

Energy Investors Funds LLC, a private equity fund manager that invests in the U.S. energy and power sector, recently acquired a 30-MW biomass power project currently under construction in Watertown, Conn., that is expected to create more than 120 jobs, according to the company. Watertown Renewable Power LLC will run on small tree branches, stumps, old cargo pallets and trees taken down as part of forestry management programs, generating enough clean electricity to power about 30,000 homes. Hundreds of construction jobs also will be created during the 24-month building period, the company boasts. Tamarack Energy Inc. started the WRP project planning more than two years ago and recently sold it to EIF for an undisclosed amount. EIF has invested in other clean energy projects, including 16 hydroelectric facilities and 19 landfill gas-fired facilities across the U.S. that turn waste methane into electricity and pipeline-quality renewable natural gas.

In Indiana, BioEnergy Development Co. will further its clean energy endeavors through a biomass electric generation plant to be constructed on a coal strip mine site in Clay County, according to BioEnergy. BioEnergy Power LLC will generate about 27 MW of electricity from wood waste previously provided to a paper plant in Terre Haute, which closed in 2007, and is expected to create 25 to 30 full-time jobs. Rob Swain, BioEnergy Development Co. president, says he chose the location because of its fuel supply and logistics. BioEnergy signed a letter of intent with an area utility company and has secured the land for development. The company also is in negotiations with a wood waste aggregator to supply the plant with feedstock, mostly from within a 100-mile radius of the proposed site, it said. BioEnergy Power hopes to begin construction by fall of 2009 and finish by the end of 2010, employing 25 to 30 full-time workers. BioEnergy also is in discussions with other companies to capture carbon dioxide for use in developing other types of energy in an attempt to further lower the plant’s carbon footprint.

Florida Biomass Energy LLC, Bradenton, Fla., proposed to build a 60-MW plant on a 53-acre site northwest of Bradenton near Palmetto, Fla. The $185 million-project primarily will use wood chips, but could burn animal material and nonfood crops in a circulating fluidized bed boiler to heat water, thus generating steam that would power a turbine and generate electricity

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